A List of Rights and Their Origins

The following is a list of frequently claimed human rights with a brief description of their origins. Some are fundamental, others are a derivative of a fundamental right. Still others are not rights at all but rather an abstract appeal to some human sensibility. These latter “rights” turn out to confuse the meaning of the word “right”.

What Is a Right

Definition: a right is the abstraction of, or focus on, the authority to use a human capability or possession. Rights are thus not self-existent, but are derived, drawn out, or abstracted from the physical reality of the composition, attributes, and powers of the human being. For more detail on how that works: Even Rocks Have Rights.

There are also so-called “legal rights”. These are not rights in the narrow sense, but are entitlements based on legislative edict. Many of the rights below are labelled as “not a right”. I am using the word “right” in a narrow sense, as is the case of inherent or inalienable rights. This is often not the way it is used in common, street parlance.

If you know of a right I have not listed, please feel free to send it to me using the “Suggest a Topic” form at the bottom of this page.

The List in Alphabetical Order

  • Assembly: fundamental right drawn out of ability to create a group.
  • Asylum: A legal but right based on several fundamental rights: See Equal, Freedom of Movement, Freedom from Cruel …, from Slavery, etc.
  • Bear arms: fundamental right drawn out the ability to carry a weapon. Also often from Self-defense, which see.
  • Choice: fundamental right drawn out of the ability to choose. Other than the right to life itself, this is the transcendent human right and may be the one from which almost all others are derived. The power to choose is the one that puts the human at the top of the food chain and all other resource chains in the world.
  • Citizenship: A legal right by legislative edict and definition.
  • Considered innocent until proven guilty: A justified entitlement, not a right. See Equal.
  • Contract: fundamental right drawn out of the ability to covenant.
  • Decent wage: Not a right: an entitlement claim against other’s rights.
  • Education: A legal right in typical usage.
  • Equal, Equality, Equal Under the Law: Not an inherent right. A legal right and an absolute priority of any peaceful government because civil activity is always an imposition of restraint upon the citizen that is administered by other citizens whose motives and judgement are always questionable.
  • Equal pay: A somewhat justified entitlement, not a right.
  • Fair trial: A justified entitlement, not a right. See Equal.
  • Freedom of Movement: a fundamental right drawn out of the ability to move. See also Choice.
  • From cruel or inhumane treatment: A justified entitlement derived from the right to choose, not a right. See also Self-defense.
  • From discrimination: A justified entitlement, not a right. See Equal.
  • From slavery: A justified entitlement, not a right. See Equal.
  • From religion: Not a right; an entitlement claim against other’s rights.
  • Legal Recognition: A justified entitlement, not a right. See Equal.
  • Liberty: fundamental right drawn out of the ability to choose. See also Property.
  • Life: fundamental right drawn out of the ability to live.
  • Marriage: A right derived from the ability to covenant. See also Choice.
  • Privacy: a derivative of the right to life. (Lack of privacy is a danger.)
  • Property: fundamental right drawn out of the ability to acquire things.
  • Redress: A justified entitlement, not a right. See Equal.
  • Religion: A fundamental right drawn out of the ability to adopt a world view, belief, faith, or philosophy of life, etc.
  • Remedy by Competent Court: A justified entitlement, not a right. See Equal.
  • Right to Nationality: A justified entitlement, not a right. See Citizenship.
  • Security of Person: a right derived from the right to life.
  • Self-defense: a right derived from the right to life.
  • Social Justice: Not a right; an entitlement claim against other’s rights.
  • Speech: fundamental right drawn out of the ability to speak. See also Choice.
  • States Rights: Powers not enumerated in the US Constitution. See the Tenth Amendment.
  • Work: A fundamental right drawn out of the ability to do things.

 

Jackson Pemberton
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A list of human rights with brief descriptions of their origins. Some fundamental, others fragments of fundamental rights. Others: not rights at all. A link to a detailed discussion of the nature and origin of inalienable rights. http://bit.ly/list_of_rights_and_their_origins

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